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CDAWeb Served Heliophysics Datasets Beginning with 'D'

DE1_6SEC_MAGAGMS: DE-1 Magnetometer (MAG-A) 6 second GMS Data - Dr. Masahisa Sugiura (NASA/GSFC)
DE1_PWI_LFC-SPECTRA: DE-1 Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI) Low Frequency Correlator (LFC) Electric and Magnetic Field Spectral Density - Donald Gurnett (University Iowa)
DE1_PWI_OR-AT: DE-1 PWI: Ephemeris and Attitude Parameters - Donald Gurnett (University Iowa)
DE1_PWI_SFC-SPECTRA: DE-1 Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI) Step Frequency Correlator (SFC) Electric and Magnetic Field Spectral Density - Donald Gurnett (University Iowa)
DE2_DUCT16MS_RPA: 16-msec total ion densities - Rod Heelis (University of Texas, Dallas)
DE2_ION2S_RPA: 2-sec ion temperature, velocity, and densities (O+, H+, He+, molecular) - Rod Heelis (University of Texas, Dallas)
DE2_NEUTRAL1S_NACS: 1-sec ambient densities and error rates - Nelson W. Spencer (NASA/GSFC)
DE2_NEUTRAL8S_FPI: 8-sec neutral wind and temperature data from FPI plus WATS - Dr. R. Niciejewski (University of Michigan)
DE2_PLASMA500MS_LANG: .5 sec electron temperature, plasma density, and satellite potential - Larry H. Brace (NASA/GSFC)
DE2_UA16S_ALL: 16-sec combined neutral and plasma unified abstract (UA) data - Mr. Larry H. Brace (NASA/GSFC)
DE2_VION250MS_IDM: 250-msec cross track ion drift velocities - Rod Heelis (University of Texas, Dallas)
DE2_WIND2S_WATS: 2-sec neutral densities, temperature, and horizontal (zonal) wind velocity - Nelson W. Spencer (NASA/GSFC)
DE_UV_SAI: DE-1 Spin-scan Auroral Imager (SAI) Ultraviolet Images - Louis A. Frank (The Univ. of Iowa)
DE_VS_EICS: DE-1 Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS), Validated Summary Data - E. G. Shelley (Lockheed Martin)
DMSP-F16_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS: Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km. - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSP-F16_SSM_MAGNETOMETER: Defense Meteorolgy Satellite Program F16 Vector Magnetometer Measurements (850km Altitude) - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSP-F17_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS: Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km. - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSP-F17_SSM_MAGNETOMETER: Defense Meteorolgy Satellite Program F17 Vector Magnetometer Measurements (850km Altitude) - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSP-F18_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS: Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km. - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSP-F18_SSM_MAGNETOMETER: Defense Meteorolgy Satellite Program F18 Vector Magnetometer Measurements (850km Altitude) - Staff (AFRL, NGDC, CU)
DMSPF16_R0_SSUSI: Links to DMSP F16 SSUSI NetCDF data, KZM image files and other sources. - Larry Paxton (JHUAPL)
DMSPF17_R0_SSUSI: Links to DMSP F17 SSUSI NetCDF data, KZM image files and other sources. - Larry Paxton (JHUAPL)
DMSPF18_R0_SSUSI: Links to DMSP F18 SSUSI NetCDF data, KMZ image files and other sources. - Larry Paxton (JHUAPL)
DMSP_R0_SSIES: Link to DMSP thermal plasma analysis package data service at the Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas. - Center for Space Sciences (UTD)
DMSP_R0_SSJ4: Link to DMSP low energy electron/ion plots and data at JHU/APL - Hardy (AFGL)
DN_K0_GBAY: DARN Goose Bay, Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_HANK: DARN Hankasalmi, Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_ICEW: DARN Iceland West (Stokkseyri),Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_KAPU: DARN Kapuskasing,Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_PACE: DARN PACE, Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_PYKK: DARN Pykkvibaer, Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DN_K0_SASK: DARN Saskatoon, Key Parameters - R. Greenwald (JHU/APL)
DSCOVR_AT_DEF: DSCOVR Definitive Attitude - A. Szabo (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
DSCOVR_AT_PRE: DSCOVR Preliminary Attitude - A. Szabo (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
DSCOVR_H0_MAG: DSCOVR Fluxgate Magnetometer 1-sec Definitive Data - A. Koval (UMBC, NASA/GSFC)
DSCOVR_H1_FC: Isotropic Maxwellian parameters for solar wind protons. - Justin C. Kasper (Smithonian Astrophysical Observatory)
DSCOVR_ORBIT_PRE: DSCOVR Predicted Orbit - A. Szabo (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

DE1_6SEC_MAGAGMS (spase://VMO/NumericalData/DE1/MAGA/PT6S)
Description
Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft was one of two satellites in the Dynamics
Explorer program.  The DE-1 and DE-2 satellites were launched by the same
vehicle so that their orbits would be coplanar, allowing two-point measurements
along magnetic field lines, for the purpose of studying coupling between the
magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere.  The DE-1 orbit was highly
elliptical with an apogee of 4.35 Re and a perigee of 500 km whereas the DE-2
spacecraft was placed in a much lower 300 x 1000 km altitude orbit. DE-1 was
spin stabilized with its spin axis normal to the plane of the orbit. DE-2 was
three axis stabilized with one face being nadir oriented. 
The study of field-aligned currents and MHD waves were the primary objectives of
the DE-1/2 magnetometer investigation. Comparison of the magnetometer data with
measurements of precipitating charged particles yielded new information on the
field-aligned current carriers.  In combination with the electric field
measurements, it was possible to determine the vertical Poynting Flux of
electromagnetic energy flowing between the magnetosphere and ionosphere and to
separate small-scale field-aligned currents from MHD waves through the
evaluation of the local ratio of the electric to magnetic field amplitudes in
these perturbations. The field-aligned current measurements and neutral
atmosphere observations also provided an opportunity for investigating
atmosphere-magnetosphere coupling and assessing the total rate of energy
transfer into the upper atmosphere.  Finally, the DE-1/2 magnetometer
investigation provided a vital service in so far as a knowledge of magnetic
field direction and intensity is essential to any number of space plasma science
investigations utilizing the various DE-1/2 particles and fields data sets. 
The DE-1 magnetic field (MAG-A) 6-second average resolution data set consists of
averages of the high resolution triaxial fluxgate measurements taken every 62.5
msec (i.e., 16 vectors/second).  The MAG-A data set consists of the three
components of the model magnetic field and difference field, B-Radial (Br),
B-Theta (Bth), and B-Phi (Bph), in *old* Geomagnetic Spherical (GMS)
Coordinates, and the difference field in local *new* Geographic Spherical (GGS)
and Geomagnetic Spherical (GMS) Coordinates, respectively, and the difference
field in local magnetic coordinates (b-para, b-parp1, b-parp2).  The R, Theta
and Phi axes are positive in the directions of increasing radial distance from
the center of the Earth (i.e., outward), increasing magnetic colatitude (i.e.,
southward) and increasing azimuth angle (i.e., magnetic east). The reference for
the MAGSAT magnetic field model is Langel et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 7, 793,
1980. The following Orbit Attitude (OA) parameters are also included in the data
set: altitude, geographic latitude and longitude, magnetic local time, and
invariant latitude. The data are provided in daily files in ASCII format.
[updated by Robert.M.Candey@nasa.gov, 2006 Jan 17, per email dated Date: Thu, 18
Feb 99 17:08:59 JST From: iyemori@swdcgw.kugi.kyoto-u.ac.jp (Toshihiko_Iyemori)]
As described in Farthing et al. (1981), the DE-1 magnetometer had a digital
resolution of +1.5 nT in its low altitude, least sensitive mode. Two higher
sensitivity modes were used at higher altitudes with digital resolutions of
+0.25 nT and +0.02 nT, respectively. The data set consists of daily files from
81258 to 91049 in ASCII format. Each file contains all of the data available for
a given day. 
The dominant source of error in the DE-1 magnetic field measurements is the
uncertainty in the attitude of the spacecraft. The DE-1 spacecraft was designed
to an attitude uncertainty specification of about 0.3 degree which appears to
have been met much of the time. As a rule of thumb each 0.1 degree in attitude
uncertainty near perigee corresponds to an error of approximately 100 nT in each
component of the field when the magnetic field measured at the sensors is
transferred to an inertial frame of reference or a model field is transferred
into the 0spacecraft frame and subtracted from the measured field.  For this
reason it is common for the residual, or delta-B field obtained by subtracting
the model field at low altitudes (i.e., high fields) to show a gradual shift of
several 100 nT from the start of a passage across the polar cap to the other
side.  (These slow shifts in the baselines of the vector field components do not
affect most scientific analyses, e.g., field-aligned current measurements, but
they can be effectively dealt with through modeling if need be.  At higher
altitudes the ambient field intensity is less and the uncertainty due to
attitude errors is correspondingly smaller.
The absolute accuracy of the DE-1 total magnetic field measurement has also been
evaluated through comparison with the precision vector/scalar magnetic field
observatories located on the ground which are used to monitor the geomagnetic
field. On the basis of such cross-comparisons utilizing DE-1 perigee data over
the life of the mission, R. Langel (private communication, 1994) found excellent
agreement between the MAG-A and ground-based observatory scalar data sets at the
20 to 40 nT level. 
In using any unfamiliar data set, caution is advised and tests to screen out
instrumental artifacts should be devised before reaching important conclusions.
De-spinning high sensitivity, boom mounted vector magnetometer data in high
fields (i.e., >1000 nT) frequently results in a readily observable residual
signal at the spin period and its harmonics. In the case of the DE-1
magnetometer measurements, the dominant causes of residual spin tone were found
to be small (0.1 to 0.01%) changes in the instrument scale factors and boom
bending of up to several tenths of a degree in response to varying thermal
inputs due to orbit/attitude driven changes in solar illumination (e.g.,
seasonal variations, eclipses, etc.). These effects were minimized through an
orbit by orbit calibration procedure which analyzed the residual spin tone
around apogee and perigee and adjusted the scale factors and sensor attitude
accordingly. Even after these in-flight calibration activities, residual spin
tone signals in the MAG-A data with amplitudes of tens of nanotesla are common
in high fields around perigee. The most probable cause of these residuals is the
transverse field dependence of fluxgate magnetometers in high fields which was
not well-appreciated at the time that DE-1/2 magnetometers were designed and
calibrated in the late 1970's. As discussed by Luhr et al. (1995) in regards to
the magnetometer on the low altitude, spin stabilized Freja spacecraft, this
non-linear effect can easily produce the residual spin frequency signals present
in the MAG-A data set. 
The MLT and ILAT algorithms were supplied by M. Sugiura (PI for the Magnetometer
Investigation) prior to launch and used in the generation of the Orbit-Attitude
database.
 
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DE1_PWI_LFC-SPECTRA
Description
S. D. Shawhan, D. A. Gurnett, D. L. Odem, R. A. Helliwell, and C. G. Park, The
plasma wave and quasi-static electric field instrument (PWI) for Dynamics
Explorer-A, Space Sci. Instrumen., 5, 535, 1981.
Two Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft were launched August 3, 1981, and placed
into coplanar polar orbits with DE-1 in a highly elliptical orbit and DE-2 in a
lower more circular orbit. The primary objective of the DE program was to
investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling processes.
The DE mission provided a wealth of new information on a wide variety of
magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena including auroral kilometric radiation,
auroral hiss, Z mode radiation, narrow-band electromagnetic emissions associated
with equatorial upper hybrid waves, whistler mode emissions, wave-particle
interactions stimulated by ground VLF transmitters, equatorial ion
cyclotron.emissions, ion Bernstein mode emissions, and electric field turbulence
along the auroral field lines. 
This file contains calibrated, full resolution, data from the DE-1 Plasma Wave
Instrument (PWI).  This instrument was designed and built by the plasma wave
group at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, in
collaboration with investigators at Stanford University's STAR Laboratory.  It
measured plasma wave phenomena and quasi-static electric fields using paired
combinations of five PWI sensors: a 200m long wire electric antenna deployed in
the spacecraft spin plane, an 8m tubular electric antenna deployed along the
spacecraft spin axis, a short 0.6m electric antenna, mounted on the boom and
oriented parallel to the long wire antenna, a magnetic loop antenna mounted on
the boom and oriented to measure the component of the magnetic field parallel to
the long wire antenna, and a magnetic search coil antenna, also mounted on a
boom and oriented to measure the magnetic field parallel to the spacecraft spin
axis.
The PWI main electronics unit consisted of a Step Frequency Correlator (SFC), a
Low Frequency Correlator (LFC), a Wideband Analog Receiver (WBR) and a Linear
Wave Receiver (LWR).  Only the LFC data are included in these files.  The SFC
data were provided in a companion fileset.  A dataset contaning available high
rate WBR LWR data may be provided in future archive products.
The LFC consisted of two receivers (LFR-A and LFR-B) with 8 analog channels
each. The analog channels were centered at 1.78, 3.12, 5.62, 10.0, 17.8, 31.2,
56.2 and 100 Hz.  Each channel's band-edge was at +/-15% of the center value. 
Each LFR in the LFC could be connected to either the Ex, Es, Ez, or H antenna
during an 8 second major frame.  In addition, the Low Frequency Correlator
provided in-phase and quadrature-phase correlations of signals from any selected
antenna pair.  Phase data are not provided in this file set, but may be present
in a future archive product.
For a detailed description of the Plasma Wave Instrument, the reader is referred
to the Space Science Instrumentation referenece above.
 
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DE1_PWI_OR-AT
Description
S. D. Shawhan, D. A. Gurnett, D. L. Odem, R. A. Helliwell, and C. G. Park, The
plasma wave and quasi-static electric field instrument (PWI) for Dynamics
Explorer-A, Space Sci. Instrumen., 5, 535, 1981.
Two Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft were launched August 3, 1981, and placed
into coplanar polar orbits with DE-1 in a highly elliptical orbit and DE-2 in a
lower more circular orbit. The primary objective of the DE program was to
investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling processes.
The DE mission provided a wealth of new information on a wide variety of
magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena including auroral kilometric radiation,
auroral hiss, Z mode radiation, narrow-band electromagnetic emissions associated
with equatorial upper hybrid waves, whistler mode emissions, wave-particle
interactions stimulated by ground VLF transmitters, equatorial ion cyclotron
emissions, ion Bernstein mode emissions, and electric field turbulence along the
auroral field lines. 
This file contains 8 second resolution emphemeris and spacecraft attitude
parameters that coincide with DE-1 telemetry frames containing PWI lowrate data.
 These parameters are not to be taken as an authoritative set, but are
convenient when working with PWI science data products.  Most of these data are
provided in the Geocentric Equatorial Inertial (GEI) TOD reference frame.  The Z
axis of the GEI frame is parallel to Earth's spin axis; the X axis points
towards the First Point of Aries with the Y axis aligned so as to generate a
right-handed coordinate system.
For a detailed description of the Plasma Wave Instrument, the reader is referred
to the Space Science Instrumentation referenece above.
 
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DE1_PWI_SFC-SPECTRA
Description
S. D. Shawhan, D. A. Gurnett, D. L. Odem, R. A. Helliwell, and C. G. Park, The
plasma wave and quasi-static electric field instrument (PWI) for Dynamics
Explorer-A, Space Sci. Instrumen., 5, 535, 1981.
Two Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft were launched August 3, 1981, and placed
into coplanar polar orbits with DE-1 in a highly elliptical orbit and DE-2 in a
lower more circular orbit. The primary objective of the DE program was to
investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling processes.
The DE mission provided a wealth of new information on a wide variety of
magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena including auroral kilometric radiation,
auroral hiss, Z mode radiation, narrow-band electromagnetic emissions associated
with equatorial upper hybrid waves, whistler mode emissions, wave-particle
interactions stimulated by ground VLF transmitters, equatorial ion
cyclotron.emissions, ion Bernstein mode emissions, and electric field turbulence
along the auroral field lines. 
This file contains calibrated, full resolution, data from the DE-1 Plasma Wave
Instrument (PWI).  This instrument was designed and built by the plasma wave
group at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, in
collaboration with investigators at Stanford University's STAR Laboratory.  It
measured plasma wave phenomena and quasi-static electric fields using paired
combinations of five PWI sensors: a 200m long wire electric antenna deployed in
the spacecraft spin plane, an 8m tubular electric antenna deployed along the
spacecraft spin axis, a short 0.6m electric antenna, mounted on the boom and
oriented parallel to the long wire antenna, a magnetic loop antenna mounted on
the boom and oriented to measure the component of the magnetic field parallel to
the long wire antenna, and a magnetic search coil antenna, also mounted on a
boom and oriented to measure the magnetic field parallel to the spacecraft spin
axis.
The PWI main electronics unit consisted of a Step Frequency Correlator (SFC), a
Low Frequency Correlator (LFC), a Wideband Analog Receiver (WBR) and a Linear
Wave Receiver (LWR).  Only the SFC data are included in these files.  The LFC
data were provided in a companion fileset.  A dataset contaning available high
rate WBR LWR data may be provided in the future.
The SFC consisted of two Step Frequency Receivers (SFR-A and SFR-B) which
provided amplitude  measurements of the electric and magnetic fields from 100 Hz
to 400 kHz and in-phase and quadrature-phase correlations of signals from any
selected antenna pair.
For a detailed description of the Plasma Wave Instrument, the reader is referred
to the Space Science Instrumentation referenece above.
 
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DE2_DUCT16MS_RPA
Description
The Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measured the bulk ion velocity in the
direction of the spacecraft motion, the constituent ion concentrations, and the
ion temperature along the satellite path. These parameters were derived from a
least squares fit to the ion number flux vs energy curve obtained by sweeping or
stepping the voltage applied to the internal retarding grids of the RPA. In
addition, a separate wide aperture sensor, a duct sensor, was flown to measure
the spectral characteristics of iregularities in the total ion concentration.
The measured parameters obtained from this investigation were important to the
understanding of mechanisms that influence the plasma; i.e., to understand the
coupling between the solar wind and the earth's atmosphere. The measurements
were made with a multigridded planar retarding potential analyzer very similar
in concept and geometry to the instruments carried on the AE satellites. The
retarding potential was variable in the range from approximately +32 to 0 volts.
The details of this voltage trace, and whether it was continuous or stepped,
depended on the operating mode of the instrument. Specific parameters deduced
from these measurements were ion temperature; vehicle potential; ram component
of the ion drift velocity; the ion and electron concentration irregularity
spectrum; and the concentration of H+, He+, O+, and Fe+, and of molecular ions
near perigee. Additional details are in W. B. Hanson et al., Space Sci.
Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 503, 1981.
It includes the DUCT portion of the high resolutiondata from the Dynamics
Explorer 2 (DE-2) Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) for the whole DE-2 mission
time period in ASCII format. This version was generated at NSSDC from the
PI-provided binary data (SPIO-00232). The DUCT files include RPA measurements of
the total ion concentration every 64 times per second. Due to a failure in the
instrument memory system RPA data are not available from 81317 06:26:40 UT to
82057 13:16:00 UT. This data set is based on the revised version of the RPA
files that was submitted by the PI team in June of 1995. The revised RPA data
include a correction to the spacecraft potential.
 
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DE2_ION2S_RPA
Description
The Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measured the bulk ion velocity in the
direction of the spacecraft motion, the constituent ion concentrations, and the
ion temperature along the satellite path. These parameters were derived from a
least squares fit to the ion number flux vs energy curve obtained by sweeping or
stepping the voltage applied to the internal retarding grids of the RPA. In
addition, a separate wide aperture sensor, a duct sensor, was flown to measure
the spectral characteristics of iregularities in the total ion concentration.
The measured parameters obtained from this investigation were important to the
understanding of mechanisms that influence the plasma; i.e., to understand the
coupling between the solar wind and the earth's atmosphere. The measurements
were made with a multigridded planar retarding potential analyzer very similar
in concept and geometry to the instruments carried on the AE satellites. The
retarding potential was variable in the range from approximately +32 to 0 volts.
The details of this voltage trace, and whether it was continuous or stepped,
depended on the operating mode of the instrument. Specific parameters deduced
from these measurements were ion temperature; vehicle potential; ram component
of the ion drift velocity; the ion and electron concentration irregularity
spectrum; and the concentration of H+, He+, O+, and Fe+, and of molecular ions
near perigee. Additional details are in W. B. Hanson et al., Space Sci.
Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 503, 1981.
It includes the high-resolution data from the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE-2)
Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) for the whole DE-2 mission time period in
ASCII format.  The ASCII version was generated at NSSDC from the PI-provided
binary data (SPIO-00232). The RPA data files include orbit parameters and
geophysical data at a time resolution of usually 2 seconds and sometimes 4
second. The following geophysical parameters are provided: ion drift vector, ion
density, ion temperature, spacecraft potential, ion densities of atomic oxygen,
hydrogen, helium, molecular constituents and high mass constituents, data
quality flag, and RMS error. The ion drift vector is given by its components in
spacecraft coordinates; the y and z components are IDM measurements. Due to a
failure in the instrument memory system RPA data are not available from 81317
06:26:40 UT to 82057 13:16:00 UT. This data set is based on the revised version
of the RPA files that was submitted by the PI team in June of 1995. The revised
RPA data include a correction to the spacecraft potential.
The Dynamics Explorer 2 Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) files contain the ion
temperature, the ion drift velocity along the sensor look direction, and the ion
composition and orbit parameters in ASCII format. The time resolution is
typically 2 seconds. Data are given as daily files (typically a few 100 Kbytes
each). NSSDC-developed software was used to read the RPA binary data and create
ASCII files.  For more on DE-2, RPA, and the binary data, see RPA_VOLDESC_DE.SFD
and RPA_FORMAT_DE.SFD. 
The RPA files are requested with the DATA_TYPE = RPA_ASCII and the ENTRY_ID =
yyddd and are then staged as yydddhhmm_RPA_DE_2S_V01.ASC; yy is the year, ddd is
the day of the year, hh is the hour, and mm is the minute of the starting time
of the data in the file.  The date range for the IDM files is 81218-83049 with
most days represented.
The data quality field contains a flag that describes the quality of the RPA
data.  A value greater than or equal to 0 indicates that the data has passed the
set of basic quality checks.  A negative value indicates that the RPA data fails
at least one check and is untrustworthy.  Following are the sequence of checks.
Tests are sequentially performed until a flag is assigned. 
   Ni<8000 or Ni>6.E6                 flag=-70
   Psi<-2 or Psi>0.5                  flag=-60
   for INVARIANT LATITUDE<50
      Ti<500 or Ti>10000              flag=-50
      |Vx|>700 m/s                    flag=-20
      Mols>O+                         flag=-40
       H+>O+                          flag=-30
       Vx=0                           flag= 40
       Vx non zero 
         Sum of light ions > 25% O+   flag= 50
         Sum of light ions < 25% O+   flag= 20
   set flag to 0 if one of the needed concentrations is unavailable.
   increase magnitude of flag by 5 if rms fit error > 10%
   for INVARIANT LATITUDE>50
      Ti<500 or Ti>200000             flag=-50
        Ti>7000
          |Vx|<1000 and |Vz|<1000     flag=-20
          Alt>600
            Mols>O+                   flag=-40
            O+>Mols                   flag= 30
          Alt<=600
           Mols>O+
             Vx>0                     flag=-10
             Vx<=0                    flag=  0
           O+>Mols                    flag= 30
        Ti<=7000
          |Vx|>2000                   flag=-20
          Mols>O+                     flag=-40
          O+>Mols                     flag= 60
   set flag to 0 if one of the needed concentrations is unavailable. Increase
magnitude of flag by 5 if rms fit error > 12%
The sweep type field contains a number (1 - 4) that represents the type of RPA
sweep used.  The sweep types are: 
  1. Integral RPA curve obtained with voltage sweep from 0 to beyond 10 volts.
  2. Electronic derivative of RPA curve obtained with voltage sweep from 0 to
beyond 10 volts.
  3. Integral RPA curve obtained with voltage sweep from 0 up to 8 volts.
  4. Electronic derivative of RPA curve obtained with voltage sweep from 0 to 8
volts.
 
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DE2_NEUTRAL1S_NACS
Description
The Neutral Atmosphere Composition Spectrometer (NACS) was designed to obtain in
situ measurements of the neutral atmospheric composition and to study the
variations of the neutral atmosphere in response to energy coupled into it from
the magnetosphere.  Because temperature enhancements, large-scale circulation
cells, and wave propagation are produced by energy input (each of which posseses
a specific signature in composition variation), the measurements permitted the
study of the partition, flow, and deposition of energy from the magnetosphere. 
Specifically, the investigation objective was to characterize the composition of
the neutral atmosphere with particular emphasis on variability in constituent
densities driven by interactions in the atmosphere, ionosphere, and
magnetosphere system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer used was nearly identical
to those flown on the AE-C, -D, and -E missions. The electron-impact ion source
was used in a closed mode. Atmospheric particles entered an antechamber through
a knife-edged orifice, where they were thermalized to the instrument
temperature. The ions with the selected charge-to-mass ratios had stable
trajectories through the hyperbolic electric field, exited the analyzer, and
entered the detection system. An off-axis beryllium-copper dynode multiplier
operating at a gain of 2.E6 provided an output pulse of electrons for each ion
arrival. The detector output had a pulse rate proportional to the neutral
density in the ion source of the selected mass. The instrument also included two
baffles that scanned across the input orifice for optional measurement of the
zonal and vertical components of the neutral wind. The mass select system
provided for 256 mass values between 0 and 51 atomic mass units (u) or each 0.2
u. It was possible to call any one of these mass numbers into each of eight
0.016-s intervals. This sequence was repeated each 0.128 s. More details are
found in G. R. Carignan et al., Space Sci. Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 429, 1981.
This data set includes daily files of the PI-provided DE-2 NACS 1-second data
and corresponding orbit parameters.  The data set was generated at NSSDC from
the original PI-provided data and software (SPTH-00010) and from the
orbit/attitude database and software that is part of the DE-2 UA data set
(SPIO-00174). The original NACS data were provided by the PI team in a highly
compressed VAX/VMS binary format on magnetic tapes. The data set covers the
whole DE-2 mission time period. Each data point is an average over the normally
8 measurements per second. Densities and relative errors are provided for atomic
oxygen (O), molecular nitrogen (N2), helium (He), atomic nitrogen (N), and argon
(Ar).  The data quality is generally quite good below 500 km, but deteriorates
towards higher altitudes as oxygen and molecular nitrogen approach their
background values (which could only be determined from infrequent spinning
orbits) and the count rate for Ar becomes very low. The difference between
minimum (background) and maximum count rate for atomic nitrogen (estimated from
mass 30) was so small that results are generally poor.  Data were lost between
12 March 1982 and 31 March 1982 when the counter overflowed.
 
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DE2_NEUTRAL8S_FPI
Description
The Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) was a high-resolution remote sensing
instrument designed to measure the thermospheric temperature, meridional wind,
and density of the following metastable atoms: atomic oxygen (singlet S and D)
and the 2P state of ionic atomic oxygen. The FPI performed a wavelength analysis
on the light detected from the thermospheric emission features by spatially
scanning the interference fringe plane with a multichannel array detector. The
wavelength analysis characterized the Doppler line profile of the emitting
species. A sequential altitude scan performed by a commandable horizon scan
mirror provided a cross-sectional view of the thermodynamic and dynamic state of
the thermosphere below the DE 2 orbit. The information obtained from this
investigation was used to study the dynamic response of the thermosphere to the
energy sources caused by magnetospheric electric fields and the absorption of
solar ultraviolet light in the thermosphere. The instrument was based on the
visible airglow experiment (VAE) used in the AE program. The addition of a
scanning mirror, the Fabry-Perot etalon, an image plane detector, and a
calibration lamp were the principal differences. Interference filters isolated
lines at (in Angstroms) 5577, 6300, 7320, 5896, and 5200. The FPI had a field of
view of 0.53 deg (half-cone angle). More details are found in P. B. Hays et al.,
Space Sci. Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 395, 1981. From February 16, 1982 to
September 11, 1982 the DE satellite was inverted and the FPI measured galactic
emissions.
NOTE: Animations of DE2-FPI science products have been created as daily summary
files. The animations contain binned averages displayed as a colour code against
a geographic background. The bin sizes are 7.5 deg latitude and 24.0 degree
longitude. The longitude bin corresponds to the approximate separation of
adjacent orbits, assuming that DE2 completed 15 orbits per day. The animations
are divided into day (06-18 LST) and night (18-06 LST). All summary file
information and animations employ spacecraft orbital attitude data. Users should
note 1) that the DE2-FPI experiment acquired airglow spectra by imaging the
terrestrial limb below and ahead of the spacecraft at an approximate tangent
altitude of 250 km; 2) all airglow spectra were acquired while the DE2
spacecraft orbited in it's normal configuration, which corresponded to calendar
months August to February in 1981/2 and 1982/3; 3) the orbital inclination of
DE2 was 90 degrees implying that DE2-FPI always viewed ahead along the meridian;
4) that DE2 flew in an elliptical orbit with perigee of 305 km and apogee of
1300 km at launch -- the altitude of DE2 for each FPI measurement is included
with each reduced data point permitting users to determine the tangent latitude
corresponding to the 250 km terrestrial airglow limb. The three gif animations
are: 
1. FPI_brightness.gif which documents the OI (6300A) column brightness in units
of log10 Rayleighs. Note different scales for day and night.
2. FPI_temperature.gif which documents the neutral thermosphere temperature in
units of degrees Kelvin.
3. FPI_wind.gif which documents the line of sight neutral wind component in
units of meters/second. The wind direction is positive when the wind blows away
from the approaching spacecraft.
 
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DE2_PLASMA500MS_LANG
Description
The Langmuir Probe Instrument (LANG) was a cylindrical electrostatic probe that
obtained measurements of electron temperature, Te, and electron or ion
concentration, Ne or Ni, respectively, and spacecraft potential.  Data from this
investigation were used to provide temperature and density measurements along
magnetic field lines related to thermal energy and particle flows within the
magnetosphere-ionosphere system, to provide thermal plasma conditions for
wave-particle interactions, and to measure large-scale and fine-structure
ionospheric effects of energy deposition in the ionosphere.  The Langmuir Probe
instrument was identical to that used on the AE satellites and the Pioneer Venus
Orbiter. Two independent sensors were connected to individual adaptive sweep
voltage circuits which continuously tracked the changing electron temperature
and spacecraft potential, while autoranging electrometers adjusted their gain in
response to the changing plasma density. The control signals used to achieve
this automatic tracking provided a continuous monitor of the ionospheric
parameters without telemetering each volt-ampere (V-I) curve.  Furthermore,
internal data storage circuits permitted high resolution, high data rate
sampling of selected V-I curves for transmission to ground to verify or correct
the inflight processed data. Time resolution was 0.5 seconds. More details are
in J. P. Krehbiel et al., Space Sci. Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 493, 1981.
The Dynamics Explorer 2 Langmuir Probe (LANG) ASCII files contain the following
geophysical parameters: electron temperature, plasma density, and satellite
potential.  They also contain the most important DE-2 orbit parameters.  The
geophysical parameters in the ASCII files were derived.from the raw volt-ampere
data from LANG.  PI-provided software was used to convert the raw binary data
into the ASCII geophysical data.
 
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DE2_UA16S_ALL
Description
This data set was generated at NSSDC from the DE-2 Unified Abstract (UA) data
and the DE-2 orbit/attitude data base and software. The daily UA files contain
16 second averages from the NACS, WATS, LANG, FPI and RPA/IDM instruments for
the whole DE-2 mission period.  The PI-provided data in VAX/VMS binary format
were converted to ASCII format and the most important orbit parameters were
added using the a/o data base and software provided by the DE project team.
Subsetting, plotting, and downloading (in ASCII format) capabilities for these
data are provided through the ATMOWeb interface at
https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmoweb/The ASCII are are also available from NSSDC
anonymous ftp archive at
ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft_data/de/de2/combined_plasma_neutrals_ua/
Each UA record contains the following data: N2, O, He, Ar, and N densities
[cm-3] from the Neutral Atmosphere Composition Spectrometer (NACS), neutral
temperature [K], eastward and upward neutral wind [m/s] from the Wind and
Temperature Spectrometer (WATS), plasma density [cm-3] and electron temperature
[K] from the Langmuir Probe experiment (LANG), wavelength [A], tangent altitude
[km], northward neutral wind [m/s], neutral temperature [K], and intensity
[Raleighs], from the Fabry Interferometer (FPI), ion temperature [K], total ion
density [cm-3], eastward, northward, and upward ion drift [m/s] from the
Retarding Potential Analyzer/Ion Drift Meter (RPA/IDM). The IDM data entry is
the revised version of June 1994. Also included are the latitude, longitude,
altitude, local time and other orbit parameters. Higher time resolution data are
available from NSSDC for the individual experiments at
ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft_data/de/de2/
This investigation used data from several spacecraft instruments to study the
large-scale neutral-plasma interactions in the thermosphere caused by
magnetospheric-ionospheric and thermospheric coupling processes. Planned use of
the models is to provide a theoretical framework in which certain important
ionospheric and atmospheric properties needed for coupling processes (such as
the Pedersen and Hall conductivities) were consistently calculated using
satellite data measured at a given height. Planned examples are (1) to calculate
vertical profiles of ionospheric properties that were useful for comparison with
incoherent scatter radar measurements and other ground-based supporting data,
(2) to identify and evaluate the neutral thermospheric heat and momentum
sources, and (3) to determine the effectiveness of high-latitude dynamic
processes in controlling the global thermospheric circulation and thermal
structure.
 
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DE2_VION250MS_IDM
Description
The Ion Drift Meter (IDM) measured the bulk motions of the ionospheric plasma
perpendicular to the satellite velocity vector. The measured parameters,
horizontal and vertical ion-drift velocities, had an expected range of plus or
minus 4 km/s. The accuracy of the measurement was expected to be plus or minus
50 m/s for the anticipated 0.5 deg accuracy in vehicle attitude determination.
The nominal time resolution of the measurement was 1/32 s. This investigation
yielded information on (1) the ion convection (electric field) pattern in the
auroral and polar ionosphere; (2) the flow of plasma along magnetic field lines
within the plasmasphere, which determines whether this motion was simply a
breathing of the protonosphere, a refilling of this region after a storm, or an
interhemispheric transport of plasma; (3) the thermal ion contribution to
field-aligned electric currents; (4) velocity fields associated with small-scale
phenomena that are important at both low and high latitudes; and (5) the
magnitude and variation of the total concentration along the flight path. The
ion drift meter measured the plasma motion parallel to the sensor face by using
a gridded collimator and multiple collectors to determine the direction of
arrival of the plasma. The instrument geometry was very similar to that used on
the Atmosphere Explorer satellites. Each sensor consisted of a square entrance
aperture that served as collimator, some electrically isolating grids, and a
segmented planar collector. The angle of arrival of the ions with respect to the
sensor was determined by measuring the ratio of the currents to the different
collector segments, and this was done by taking the difference in the logarithms
of the current. Two techniques were used to determine this ratio. In the
standard drift sensor (SDS), the collector segments were connected in pairs to
two logarithmic amplifiers. The second technique, called the univeral drift
sensor (UDS), allowed simultaneous measurement of both components. Here, each
collector segment was permanently connected to a logarithmic amplifier and two
difference amplifiers were used to determine the horizontal and vertical arrival
angles simultaneously. The IDM consisted of two sensors, one providing the SDS
output and the other providing the UDS output. Further details are in R. A.
Heelis et al., Space Sci. Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 511, 1981. During the period
from 81317 to 82057 the instrument memory suffered a critical upset and ion
temperatures and drifts are not available during this period.
This data set is available from NSSDC's anonymous ftp archive at
ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft_data/de/de2/plasma_idm/ It includes the
high-resolution data from the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE-2) Ion Drift Meter (IDM)
for the whole DE-2 mission time period in ASCII format. This data set was
generated at NSSDC by converting the PI-provided data set (SPIO-00232) from
binary to ASCII format. The IDM data files provide absolute measurements of the
cross track ion drift velocity 4 times per second. The complete drift vector can
be obtained by combining IDM and RPA ion drift measurements.
 
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DE2_WIND2S_WATS
Description
The Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (WATS) measured the in situ neutral winds,
the neutral particle temperatures, and the concentrations of selected gases. The
objective of this investigation was to study the interrelationships among the
winds, temperatures, plasma drift, electric fields, and other properties of the
thermosphere that were measured by this and other instruments on the spacecraft.
Knowledge of how these properties are interrelated contributed to an
understanding of the consequences of the acceleration of neutral particles by
the ions in the ionosphere, the acceleration of ions by neutrals creating
electric fields, and the related energy transfer between the ionosphere and the
magnetosphere. Three components of the wind, one normal to the satellite
velocity vector in the horizontal plane, one vertical, and one in the satellite
direction were measured. A retarding potential quadrupole mass spectrometer,
coupled to the atmosphere through a precisely orificed antechamber, was used. It
was operated in either of two modes: one employed the retarding capability and
the other used the ion source as a conventional nonretarding source. Two
scanning baffles were used in front of the mass spectrometer: one moved
vertically and the other moved horizontally. The magnitudes of the horizontal
and vertical components of the wind normal to the spacecraft velocity vector
were computed from measurements of the angular relationship between the neutral
particle stream and the sensor. The component of the total stream velocity in
the satellite direction was measured directly by the spectrometer system through
determination of the required retarding potential.  At altitudes too high for
neutral species measurements, the planned operation required the instrument to
measure the thermal ion species only.  A series of four sequentially occurring
slots --each a 2-s long measurement interval-- was adapted for the basic
measurement format of the instrument. Different functions were commanded into
these slots in any combination, one per measurement interval. Thus the time
resolution can be 2, 4, 6, or 8 seconds.  Further details are found in N. W.
Spencer et al., Space Sci. Instrum., v. 5, n. 4, p. 417, 1981.
This data set consists of the high-resolution data of the Dynamics .Explorer 2
Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (WATS) experiment. The files contain the
neutral density, temperature and horizontal (zonal) wind velocity, and orbital
parameters in ASCII format. The time resolution is typically 2 seconds. Data are
given as daily files (typically a few 100 Kbytes each). PI-provided software
(WATSCOR) was used to correct the binary data set.  NSSDC-developed software was
used to add the orbit parameters, to convert the binary into ASCII format and to
combine the (PI-provided) orbital files into daily files. For more on DE-2,
WATS, and the binary data, see the WATS_VOLDESC_SFDU_DE.DOC and
WATS_FORMAT_SFDU_DE.DOC files. More information about the processing done at
NSSDC is given in WATS_NSSDC_PRO_DE.DOC.
 
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DE_UV_SAI
Description
   Instrument functional description:
       The spin-scan auroral imagers (SAI) comprise three photometers which
   provide images of Earth at various wavelengths via interference filters
   mounted on a wheel and selected by ground command.  Two of the photometers
   provide visible wavelength images, and the third provides images at
   vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths.
       The three photometers are mounted on the spacecraft such that their
   fields of view are separated by about 120 degrees in a plane oriented
   perpendicular to the spin axis.  Each photometer in operation collects
   one scan line during each spacecraft rotation, with an internal mirror
   stepping once per rotation to start a new scan line.
       An auroral image is a nadir-centered two-dimensional pixel array
   provided by the spacecraft rotation and the photometer's stepping mirror
   which advances the field of view 0.25 degrees once per rotation in a
   direction perpendicular to the plane of rotation.  A change in mirror-
   stepping direction signals the start of a new image.  One, two, or
   three photometers may be in operation at one time.  The images from all
   operating photometers are telemetered simultaneously with image repetition
   rates that typically vary from about 3 to 12 minutes.
       One of the three imaging photometers is equipped with filters and a
   photocathode for observations at vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths, in
   particular emissions of the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band of molecular
   nitrogen at about 140 to 170 nm.  Imaging at these wavelengths allows
   coverage of the auroral oval in both the dark and sunlit ionospheres.
   The filter array for the vacuum-ultraviolet imaging photometer also
   includes filters for atomic hydrogen Lyman alpha at 121.6 nm and oxygen
   lines at 130.4 and 135.6 nm.
       The full width of the fields of view of the photometers
   corresponding to a single pixel is 0.29 degrees.  An image frame
   consists of all scan lines obtained by mirror steps in one direction
   which deflect the field of view by 0.25 degrees per rotation.  The
   angular separation of two consecutive pixels in the direction of
   spacecraft rotation is about 0.23 degrees.  A full frame has 120
   scan lines or 30 degrees of width.  For routine processing the
   angular width along a scan line is 150 pixels, or about 34.5 degrees
   of length.  The frame width is occasionally adjusted to less than
   120 scan lines.
   Reference:
   Frank, L. A., J. D. Craven, K. L. Ackerson, M. R. English, R. H. Eather,
       and R. L. Carovillano, Global auroral imaging instrumentation for
       the Dynamics Explorer mission, Space Sci. Inst., 5, 369-393, 1981.
   Data set description:
       Each DE SAI UV image CDF contains all of images collected by the
   UV photometer during one day of operations.  The displayable image
   counts are in variable 3.
       Coordinates are calculated for each position of the image count array.
   These coordinates are in variables 14, 15, and 16.
       To facilitate viewing of the images, a mapping of pixel value to a
   recommended color table based on the characteristics of the selected
   filter will be included with each image.  See the description of variables
   17, 18, and 19 below.
       A relative intensity scale is provided by the uncompressed count
   table of variable 20.  Approximate intensity levels in kiloRayleighs are
   given in the intensity table of variable 21.
       Other variables provide orbit and attitude data and information about
   the selected filter and the mirror stepping direction.
 Variable descriptions:
  1,2. Start time
        The time assigned to an image is the start time of the initial scan
        line within a resolution of one second.
    3. Image counts
        Image pixel counts range from 0 to 255.  They are stored in a two-
        dimensional byte array of 121 columns by 150 rows.  Each column
        contains one scan line.  Images will generally not fill all of the
        121 columns.  When an image is displayed with row 1 at the top and
        column 1 on the left, the spacecraft spin axis is oriented to the
        left in the display, and the orbit normal vector is oriented to the
        right.
    4. Filter
        Twelve filters are available for ultra-violet imaging; the filter
        number, 1-12, is given here.  In addition, the peak wavelength in
        Angstroms is given for the selected filter.
    5. Presumed altitude of emissions
        The presumed altitude of the emissions seen in the image varies
        with the characteristics of the filter used.
  6,7. First and last mirror location counters (MLCs)
        The MLC range is from 28 in column 1 (leftmost) to 148 in column 121
        (rightmost).  The direction of mirror stepping motion is shown by
        comparing first and last MLCs.
    8. Orbit/attitude time
        Whenever possible, the approximate center time of the image is used
        for determining the orbit and attitude parameters.  If O/A data is
        not available for the center time, the closest available O/A time
        is used.
    9. Spacecraft position vector, GCI
   10. Spacecraft velocity vector, GCI
   11. Spacecraft spin axis unit vector, GCI
   12. Sun position unit vector, GCI
   13. Orbit normal unit vector, GCI
   14. Geographic longitude or right ascension
        East longitude is given for each image pixel on the Earth at the
        altitude given in variable 5.  When the pixel altitude is greater
        than the value of variable 5, the right ascension is given.
   15. Geographic latitude or declination
        North latitude is given for each image pixel on the Earth at the
        altitude given in variable 5.  When the pixel altitude is greater
        than the value of variable 5, the declination is given.
   16. Pixel altitude
        For each image pixel on the Earth, the presumed altitude of the
        emissions is used.  This is equal to the value of variable 5.  For each
        pixel off the Earth, the altitude of the line of sight is used.
   17. Pixel UT
        This array gives the start time for the collection of each image pixel.
   18. RGB color table
        This is the recommended color table to be used with the
        limits given in variables 19 and 20.
19,20. Low and high color mapping limits
        The low and high color limits are recommended for remapping
        the color table entries, as follows:
            For pixel values less than the low limit, use the color
                at table position 1.
            For pixel values greater than or equal to the low limit
                and less than or equal to the high limit, use the color
                at table position (pix-low)/(high-low) x 255 + 1.
            For pixel values greater than the high limit, use the color
                at table position 256.
   21. Expanded count table
        The image pixel counts are quasi-logarithmically compressed to the
        range 0-255.  This table gives the average of the uncompressed range
        for each compressed count value.  Table entries 1-128 correspond to
        compressed counts 0-127 respectively.  Count levels greater than
        127 are considered overflow.
   22. Intensity table
        For each of the twelve filters, approximate intensity levels in
        kiloRayleighs are given for each compressed count value.  Table
        entries 1-128 correspond to compressed counts 0-127 respectively.
        No count conversion data is available for count levels greater than
        127.
   Supporting software:
         Directions for obtaining supporting software is available on the SAI
   website at the URL .http://www-pi.physics.uiowa.edu/www/desai/software/. 
   Included is an IDL program that displays the images with the recommended
   color bar and provides approximate intensities and coordinate data for
   each pixel.
 
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DE_VS_EICS
Description
 Data: 96 second average fluxes for H+, O+, and He+ ions in 15 energy and 14
pitch angle bins. Including data uncertainties, data quality indicators and
spacecraft position information. 
References: 
1. Peterson, W.K., H.L. Collin, M.F. Doherty and C.M. Bjorklund, O+ and He+
restricted and extended (bi-modal) ion conic distributions, Geophys. Res.Lett.,
19, 1439, 1992. 
2. Collin, H.L., W.K. Peterson, J.F. Drake, and A.W. Yau, The helium components
of energetic terrestrial ion upflows: Their occurrence,  morphology, and
intensity, J. Geophys. Res., 93, 7558, 1988. 
3. Chiu, Y.T., R.M. Robinson, H.L. Collin, S. Chakrabarti, and G.R. Gladstone,
Exospheric imaging in the extreme ultraviolet, Geophys. Res. Lett., 17, 267,
1990. 
4. Robinson, R.M., Y.T. Chiu, R.C. Catura, H.L. Collin, D. Garrido and R. Smith,
Instrumental and observational requirements for space-based imaging of
magnetospheric emissions, Instrumentation for magnetospheric Imager, Proceedings
of the SPIE, The International Society for Optical Engineering,  Bellingham,
Washington, S. Chakrabarti, Ed., Vol. 1744, 13, 1992.
These data are are a validated sub set of the full resolution DE/EICS data set
archived in native VAX/VMS format at NSSDC under the DATA_SET_NAME: 
EICS_STAND_ALONE_TELEMETRY_FILE_SYSTEM. The data in this CDF are a super-set of
the data used to prepare the four large scale statistical studies referenced
above. 
The three data quality indicators N C and A described in the documentation
accompanying the EICS_STAND_ALONE_TELEMETRY_FILE_SYSTEM as well as several other
data quality and mode indicators are included here.  These data indicators are
described on line and are referenced from the DE project home page on the Space
Physics Data System.
URL: ftp://sierra.space..lockheed.com/DATA/de/DE_eics_home.html   IF Unavailable
try: http://leadbelley.lanl.gov/spds/project-pages-only.html 
Each physical cdf file contains data for an entire UT day.  The files have names
of the form YYDDD_EICS_DE.cdf
The file naming convention includes the UT day encoded in the NASA standard
YYDDD format. YY are the last two digits of the year and DDD is the day of year
with January 1 = 001. 
EICS data were not acquired in all 24 UT day intervals. If no input data were
available for a UT day period, no CDF file was produced.  IFEICS data were
available but there are no data available stisfying the input requirements for
this data set for a UT day interval, the CDF file contains one record of
CDF_FILL data entries for all record variable entries. 
Metadata providedby W.K. Peterson with the helpof Mona Kessel
Modification History
Created October, 1995 by W.K. Peterson
Add Q_FLAG_FILE_CORRUPTED variable to indicate intervals for which full data
quality information is not available. 10/10/95 
 
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DMSP-F16_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS
Description
Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km altitude and over a
range of energies from 30 eV to 30 keV using the Special Sensor J (SSJ)
instrument.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov with questions and comments.
Many individuals made important contributions including: D. Hardy, E. Holeman,
F. Rich, D. Ober, G. Wilson, J. Machuzak, K. Kadinsky-Cade, J. McGarity, W.F.
Denig, K. Martin, R. Redmon, D. Knipp, L. Kilcommons.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
 
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DMSP-F16_SSM_MAGNETOMETER
Description
Magetic measurements taken at nominally 850km altitude using a 3-axis fluxgate
magnetometer.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov or
liam.kilcommons@colorado.edu with questions and comments. Many individuals made
important contributions including: F. Rich, G. Wilson, D. Ober, R. Redmon, D.
Knipp, L. Kilcommons, P. Alken.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
Version 1.0.1
Apex and geocentric east-north-up coordinates added. Polynomial baseline
corrected versions of perturabtions added.
Version 1.0.2
Auroral region (from SSJ boundary identification) and orbit index added 
Version 1.0.3
Added Spacecraft Along Track Unit Vector
Switched naming convention from corrected ending in _COR to original ending in
_ORIG, so that MFIT corrected data would appear to be default. Removed any
variables that were uncorrected except for spacecraft coordinates.
Version 1.0.4
Added recomputed magnetic perturbations, i.e. recomputed the IGRF field for the
improved locations, and subtracted it from the observed total field. Added
spacecraft across track unit vector. Switch SC_APEX_LON to -180. to 180. instead
of 0.-360.
 
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DMSP-F17_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS
Description
Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km altitude and over a
range of energies from 30 eV to 30 keV using the Special Sensor J (SSJ)
instrument.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov with questions and comments.
Many individuals made important contributions including: D. Hardy, E. Holeman,
F. Rich, D. Ober, G. Wilson, J. Machuzak, K. Kadinsky-Cade, J. McGarity, W.F.
Denig, K. Martin, R. Redmon, D. Knipp, L. Kilcommons.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
 
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DMSP-F17_SSM_MAGNETOMETER
Description
Magetic measurements taken at nominally 850km altitude using a 3-axis fluxgate
magnetometer.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov or
liam.kilcommons@colorado.edu with questions and comments. Many individuals made
important contributions including: F. Rich, G. Wilson, D. Ober, R. Redmon, D.
Knipp, L. Kilcommons, P. Alken.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
Version 1.0.1
Apex and geocentric east-north-up coordinates added. Polynomial baseline
corrected versions of perturabtions added.
Version 1.0.2
Auroral region (from SSJ boundary identification) and orbit index added 
Version 1.0.3
Added Spacecraft Along Track Unit Vector
Switched naming convention from corrected ending in _COR to original ending in
_ORIG, so that MFIT corrected data would appear to be default. Removed any
variables that were uncorrected except for spacecraft coordinates.
Version 1.0.4
Added recomputed magnetic perturbations, i.e. recomputed the IGRF field for the
improved locations, and subtracted it from the observed total field. Added
spacecraft across track unit vector. Switch SC_APEX_LON to -180. to 180. instead
of 0.-360.
 
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DMSP-F18_SSJ_PRECIPITATING-ELECTRONS-IONS
Description
Precipitating electrons and ions observed at nominally 850km altitude and over a
range of energies from 30 eV to 30 keV using the Special Sensor J (SSJ)
instrument.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov with questions and comments.
Many individuals made important contributions including: D. Hardy, E. Holeman,
F. Rich, D. Ober, G. Wilson, J. Machuzak, K. Kadinsky-Cade, J. McGarity, W.F.
Denig, K. Martin, R. Redmon, D. Knipp, L. Kilcommons.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
 
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DMSP-F18_SSM_MAGNETOMETER
Description
Magetic measurements taken at nominally 850km altitude using a 3-axis fluxgate
magnetometer.  Please contact Rob.Redmon@noaa.gov or
liam.kilcommons@colorado.edu with questions and comments. Many individuals made
important contributions including: F. Rich, G. Wilson, D. Ober, R. Redmon, D.
Knipp, L. Kilcommons, P. Alken.
Modification History
This is version 1, beta.
Version 1.0.1
Apex and geocentric east-north-up coordinates added. Polynomial baseline
corrected versions of perturabtions added.
Version 1.0.2
Auroral region (from SSJ boundary identification) and orbit index added 
Version 1.0.3
Added Spacecraft Along Track Unit Vector
Switched naming convention from corrected ending in _COR to original ending in
_ORIG, so that MFIT corrected data would appear to be default. Removed any
variables that were uncorrected except for spacecraft coordinates.
Version 1.0.4
Added recomputed magnetic perturbations, i.e. recomputed the IGRF field for the
improved locations, and subtracted it from the observed total field. Added
spacecraft across track unit vector. Switch SC_APEX_LON to -180. to 180. instead
of 0.-360.
 
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DMSPF16_R0_SSUSI
Description
No TEXT global attribute value.
 
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DMSPF17_R0_SSUSI
Description
No TEXT global attribute value.
 
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DMSPF18_R0_SSUSI
Description
No TEXT global attribute value.
 
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DMSP_R0_SSIES
Description
No TEXT global attribute value.
 
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DMSP_R0_SSJ4
Description
No TEXT global attribute value.
 
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DN_K0_GBAY
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.3
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_HANK
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.5
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_ICEW
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.3
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_KAPU
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.3
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_PACE
Description
vlptm version 2.42
Ref1: Satellite Experiments Simultaneous with Antarctic Measurements (SESAME) 
to be submitted to Reviews of Geophysics (copy held by GGS group at NASA)
Ref2:Baker et al.,EOS 70,p785 1989. Ref3: Greenwald et al.,Radio Sci.20,p63 1985
Info:Keith Morrison,GGS Scientist,British AntarcticSurvey,Cambridge,CB3 0ET,UK
E-mail: 19989::MORRISON
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_PYKK
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.5
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DN_K0_SASK
Description
vlptm $Revision: 4.3
Modification History
skeleton table implemented 
new formats with all the DEPEND attrs set
ISTP KPGS Standard & Conventions version 1 implemented
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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DSCOVR_AT_DEF
Description
DSCOVR 3-axis stabilized definitive Attitude data file.
5 second time resolution
Convention: intrinsic rotations applied in Yaw, Pitch, Roll order
Extended Kalman Filter applied to ground based solution during normal
operations. OBC solution used during calibration maneuvers.
Modification History
08/02/2017 Initial Release
 
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DSCOVR_AT_PRE
Description
DSCOVR 3-axis stabilized preliminary Attitude data file.
Time resolution varies.
Convention: intrinsic rotations applied in Yaw, Pitch, Roll order
 5 point Median Filter applied to DCM matrix
Modification History
8/29/2016 - Original Implementation
 
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DSCOVR_H0_MAG
Description
DSCOVR Fluxgate Magnetometer 1-sec Definitive Data                              
Modification History
12/01/2016 Initial release
 
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DSCOVR_H1_FC
Description
Best fit parameters from nonlinear fitting of a single, isotropic Maxwellian
velocity distribution function to sets of DSCOVR Faraday Cup measurements of the
solar wind thermal proton peak. 1-minute resolution data are obtained by fitting
to the 1-minute integrated distributions, comprising ~15 as-measured charged
current spectra each. Reported uncertainties are fitting uncertainties, which do
not account for so-called prior uncertainties associated with non-Maxwellian
distributions in nature or with conditions that vary on timescales faster than 1
minute. The uncertainties associated with measurement of charged flux as a
function of energy are propagated. Certain empirical corrections have been
applied.
Modification History
V01: 28-FEB-2017
 
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DSCOVR_ORBIT_PRE
Description
DSCOVR Predicted Orbit data file.
 
Dataset in CDAWeb
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